Matthew Chapter 27, Verse 11

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Book of Matthew
Chapter 27
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11: ο δε ιησους εστη εμπροσθεν του ηγεμονος και επηρωτησεν αυτον ο ηγεμων λεγων συ ει ο βασιλευς των ιουδαιων ο δε ιησους εφη αυτω συ λεγεις— edit Textus Receptus
11: And Jesus stood before the governor: and the governor asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And Jesus said unto him, Thou sayest.— edit KJV text
11: And Jesus stood before the governor, and the governor asked him, saying: Art thou the king of the Jews? Jesus saith to him: Thou sayest it.— edit Douay text


And Jesus stood before the governor. Many things are omitted by Matthew in the account of this trial, which are recorded by the other evangelists. A much more full account is found in Jn 18:28ff.

And the governor asked him, etc. This question was asked on account of the charge which the Jews brought against Jesus, of "perverting the nation, and forbidding to give tribute to Caesar," Lk 23:2. It was on this charge that, after consultation, they had agreed to arraign him before Pilate. They had condemned him for blasphemy; but they well knew that Pilate would altogether disregard an accusation of that kind. They therefore attempted to substitute a totally different accusation from that on which they had professed to find him guilty; to excite the jealousy of the Roman governor, and to procure his death on a false charge of treason against the Roman emperor.

Thou sayest. That is, thou sayest right, or thou sayest the truth. We may wonder why the Jews, if they heard this confession, did not press it upon the attention of Pilate as a full confession of his guilt. It was what they had accused him of. But it might be doubtful whether, in the confusion, they heard the confession; or, if they did, Jesus took away all occasion of triumph by explaining to Pilate the nature of his kingdom, Jn 18:36. Though he acknowledged that he was a king, yet he stated fully that his kingdom was not of this world, and that therefore it could not be alleged against him as treason against the Roman emperor. This was done in the palace, apart from the Jews; and fully satisfied Pilate of his innocence, Jn 18:38.

-- edit commentary

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